Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions


I have a decayed tree, at the front of my house and it's on Town property. Who can I report this to?

For more information, please call 519-599-3131 ext.276

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The snowplow hit my mailbox. Who do I call?

--For information please call 519-599-3131 ext 276

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Where can I purchase a stationary curbside garbage box/bin?

You can purchase a stationary curbside garbage bin/box at many hardware stores. Please remember to use the Town stationary garbage bin "Waste Tab" to let collectors know whether the bin is full or empty. Thank you!

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Are there any other infractions under the STA By-law which could result in demerit points being assessed against the STA premises?

Yes. Demerit points are assessed in accordance with the table below.

INFRACTION

DEMERIT POINTS

Fire Protection & Prevention Act/Fire Code

15

Operating without a licence

7

Building Code Act (construction w/o a permit)

7

Sleeping in excess of maximum permitted

5

Non-availability of Responsible Person

5

Noise By-law Infraction

5

Not providing updated information

3

Contrary to Parking Management Plan

3

Contrary to Property Management Plan

3

Not posting licence

3

Property Standards

3

Long Grass

2

Waste/Garbage Collection

2

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Is there an appeal process in place where the issuance of demerit points and the resulting administrative penalty can be reviewed?

A person may appeal the issuance of demerit points and an administrative penalty to the STA Committee. An administrative penalty that is not paid may be added to the property taxes to which it applies and be collected in the same manner as taxes.

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I am an STA owner and as result of a noise complaint at my STA one of my guests was issued a noise infraction violation ticket of $615 by the OPP. Are there any repercussions in relation to my STA licence?

Yes. A Demerit Point and administrative penalty system has been established to enforce the STA By-law. Five (5) demerit points are assessed against the STA premises for a noise violation and a $250.00 administrative penalty is levied against the owner once the accused either pays the fine or is found guilty at his/her trial.

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I have concerns over the noise that is being generated by the STA on my street. This is causing me anguish and preventing my family from enjoying the peace and quiet which one would expect in a residential area. What recourse do I have?

In the event the STA premises does cause a negative impact or is, in your opinion in contravention of a Town By-law please contact the By-law Department at (519) 599-3131 ext. 249. For afterhours noise related issues, please contact the OPP at (888) 310-1122. For emergencies and pressing matters please dial 911. Alternatively you can contact the Responsible Person (RP) for that property. Under the STA By-law the RP is required to attend to and respond to all issues at an STA within 1 hour of being contacted.  Please consult the spreadsheet at http://www.thebluemountains.ca/sta-applications.cfm for a complete list of the responsible persons for all STA’s.

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I plan on buying a property that is being advertised as being “grandfathered” for STA purposes. Does this mean I can get an STA licence?

Not necessarily. You would have to satisfy the same burden of proof as any other STA owner claiming legal non-conforming use “grandfathered”. You should seek legal advice from your solicitor or lawyer in this regard. See above for more information on this.

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Carbon Monoxide Questions and Answers

~~Carbon Monoxide (CO) Properties
1. How is CO generated in the home?


CO is a by-product of incomplete combustion of fuel such as natural gas, propane, heating oil, kerosene, coal, charcoal, gasoline, wood, or other bio-fuels. This incomplete combustion can occur in any device that depends on burning a fuel for energy or heat.

Examples of fuel burning devices:


Home furnace
 Space heater
 Decorative fireplace
 Wood stove
 Kitchen stove or grill
 Gas/charcoal barbeque
 Hot water heater
 Automobile
 Lawnmower

 

Automobiles left running in an attached garage, a portable generator operating near an open window or in the garage, an outdoor gas barbecue operated inside the house, a grill or kerosene heater that is not properly vented, or a fireplace chimney that is dirty or plugged may create unsafe levels of CO.

When these devices are properly installed, maintained and vented, the CO produced can be prevented from reaching unsafe levels in the home.
2. What are the symptoms of CO poisoning?


Exposure to CO can cause flu-like symptoms such as headaches, nausea, dizziness, burning eyes, confusion, drowsiness and even loss of consciousness, without the elevated temperature associated with the flu. In severe cases, CO poisoning can cause brain damage and death. The elderly, children and people with heart or respiratory conditions may be particularly sensitive to CO.

It can poison the body quickly in high concentrations, or slowly over long periods of time.
3. How do CO alarms work?


CO alarms monitor airborne concentration levels (parts per million) of CO over time, and sound an alarm when harmful levels are present. They are designed to sense low CO concentrations over a long period of time as well as high concentrations over a short period of time.
4. How expensive are CO alarms?


CO alarms range in price from approximately $26 to over $100 depending on whether they are hard-wired, battery operated or plug-in and whether they have additional features (i.e. battery back-up, digital display, etc.). The average mid-range plug-in/battery back-up model is between $35 and $40 per unit.
5. Why are CO alarms required to be installed adjacent to sleeping areas in the home?


Proper placement of a CO alarm is important. The CO alarm must be located adjacent to all sleeping areas of the home to increase the likelihood that sleeping occupants will hear the alarm if it goes off.
6. At what height should CO alarms be installed?


Unlike smoke, which rises to the ceiling, CO mixes with air. Hence CO alarms may be installed at any height. However, if a combination smoke/CO alarm is used, it must be installed on or near the ceiling as per manufacturer’s instructions, to ensure that it can detect smoke effectively.
7. Do CO alarms sound different from smoke alarms?


Yes. CO alarms sound different from smoke alarms when they activate. By introducing a new emergency device into the home, it is important that everyone in the household knows the difference between an alarming smoke alarm and an alarming CO alarm.

As well, everyone needs to know the difference between an actual alarm sound versus the low battery or end of life warnings for both their smoke and CO alarms.

Owners should consult their instruction manual to obtain further information on the characteristics of the audible signals for each device.
8. If your CO alarm sounds, and you or other occupants suffer from symptoms of CO poisoning, what should you do?


Immediately have everyone in the home move outdoors and then call 911 or your local emergency services number from outside the building.
9. If your CO alarm sounds, and no one is suffering from symptoms of CO poisoning, what should you do?


Check to see if the battery needs replacing, or the alarm has reached its "end of life" before calling 911.

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General Ontario Fire Code (OFC) and
 Ontario Building Code (OBC)
10. Why is the Ontario Fire Code (OFC) being amended?


OFC changes relating to CO alarms are part of the implementation of the Hawkins Gignac Act, 2013, which received Royal Assent in December 2013. This Act amended the Fire Protection and Prevention Act, 1997 (FPPA) to allow the regulation of CO alarms through amendments to the OFC. The Act also proclaims the week beginning November 1 as Carbon Monoxide Awareness Week.
11. What is the relationship between the OFC and OBC (Ontario Building Code) with respect to CO alarm requirements?


The OBC and OFC are companion regulations adopted by Ontario as uniform minimum mandatory standards for building construction and fire/life safety. New construction, renovations and building change of use are regulated by the OBC. Existing buildings are regulated by the OFC, to maintain OBC provisions and/or for retrofit requirements. The CO alarm requirements in the OFC were developed to not exceed existing OBC requirements.
12. Do all newly constructed residential buildings require the installation of a CO alarm?


Yes. Under the OBC, CO alarms have been mandatory in new residential buildings containing a fuel-burning appliance (e.g. a gas furnace/stove) or a storage garage (for motor vehicles) since 2001. Until these OFC amendments, there were no provincial requirements for CO alarms in properties built before 2001. However, many municipalities have required these devices through municipal by-laws.

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Compliance Schedule
13. When did the CO alarm regulation come into force?


The CO alarm regulation came into force on October 15, 2014. Buildings that contain no more than six suites of residential occupancy are required to comply with the installation and replacement requirements within 6 months of the in-force date (April 15, 2015, at the latest).

Buildings that contain more than six suites of residential occupancy are required to comply with the installation and replacement requirements within 12 months of the in-force date (October 15, 2015, at the latest).

The maintenance and testing requirements for existing CO alarms (e.g. those devices previously installed to comply with the OBC or a municipal by-law) take effect on the in-force date (October 15, 2014).

[Div. B, 2.16.1.1.(2), 6.3.4.7.(2)]
14. Why are there 6 and 12 month phase-in periods for CO alarm installation and replacement?


The two phase-in periods for the installation and replacement of CO alarms recognizes the impact of the requirement on different size buildings.

The 6 month phase-in period for smaller residential properties considers the incidental cost and time associated with owners purchasing and installing CO alarms.

The 12 month phase-in period provides building owners, property managers and landlords of larger residential properties additional time to plan for, procure and install CO alarms.
15. Do the 6 and 12 month phase-in periods apply to CO alarm maintenance and testing?


No. The maintenance and testing requirements take effect on October 15, 2014, the effective date of the regulation.

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Application
16. Do all existing residential buildings require CO alarms?


Existing residential occupancies that contain at least one fuel-burning appliance (e.g., gas water heater or gas furnace), fireplace or an attached garage, require the installation of a CO alarm.

[Div. B, 2.16.1.1.(1)]
17. Are CO alarms required in non-residential buildings (i.e. care, care and treatment facilities, daycare centres, etc.)?


The OBC and the OFC currently require CO alarms in residential occupancies only. Other regulations, such as those under the Occupational Health and Safety Act, may require CO concentrations to not exceed specified levels so as to ensure a safe work place. In these circumstances, it is advisable to consult with the Ministry of Labour on specific requirements.

[Div. B, 2.16.1.1.(1)]
18. What are examples of residential buildings to which this CO alarm regulation applies?


The following are examples of residential buildings:
• Houses (detached, semi-detached, attached)
• Rental Apartments/Condominiums
• Residential Group Homes (adults, youth, children)
• Hostels/Domiciliary Hostels
• Social Housing
• Student Residences/Dormitories
• Retirement Homes (classified as residential occupancies)
• Camps for Housing Workers
• Boarding, Lodging, Rooming and Halfway Houses
• Convents/Monasteries
• Clubs (residential)
• Hotels/Motels
• Open and semi-secure detention for Youth
• Recreational Camps
• Residential Schools
• Shelters (homeless/women)
19. Does the OFC require CO visual alarms for people who are deaf or hearing impaired?


No. This maintains consistency with OBC requirements.

Although CO visual alarms are not mandatory, people who are deaf or hearing impaired are encouraged to install supplemental warning devices that can be connected to their CO alarm(s). Supplemental devices available on the market include strobe lights and motorized bed shakers.

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Responsibilities
20. Who is responsible for installing CO alarms in rental dwelling units?


The landlord of the building is responsible for the installation of the CO alarms.

[Div. B, 2.16.1.2.]
21. Who is responsible for maintaining CO alarms in rental dwelling units?


The landlord is responsible for the maintenance of CO alarms. The landlord is also responsible for providing the tenant with CO alarm maintenance instructions.

[Div. B, 6.3.4.2., 6.3.4.4.]
22. Who is responsible for installing CO alarms in boarding, lodging and rooming houses?


The landlord is responsible for the installation of the CO alarms.

[Div. B, 2.16.1.2.]
23. Who is responsible for maintaining CO alarms in boarding, lodging and rooming houses?


The landlord is responsible for the maintenance of CO alarms. The landlord is also responsible for providing the tenant with CO alarm maintenance instructions.
24. Who is responsible for the installation and maintenance of CO alarms in residential condominium suites?


The owner of the condominium suite is responsible for the installation and maintenance of CO alarms in the suite. Often, there are agreements between the owner and the condominium corporation in which the corporation takes on this responsibility on behalf of the owner.

In a situation where the condominium owner rents out the suite to a tenant, the owner takes on the role of the landlord and is responsible for the installation and maintenance of the CO alarms. Again, there are often agreements between the owner/landlord and the condominium corporation, in which the corporation takes on this responsibility on behalf of the owner/landlord.

[Div. B, 2.16.1.2., 6.3.4.2]
25. What responsibilities do tenants have under the CO alarm regulation?


Tenants are responsible for notifying the landlord as soon as they become aware that a CO alarm in their unit is disconnected, not operating, or its operation is impaired. Also, tenants may not disable their CO alarms.

[Div. B, 6.3.4.5., 6.3.4.6]

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Installation
26. When are CO alarms required to be installed within a house?


If the house contains a fuel burning appliance, fireplace or an attached garage, a CO alarm is required to be installed adjacent to each sleeping area in the house.

For optimum protection, it is recommended that additional CO alarm(s) be installed in other levels and/or areas of the home that are in proximity to a CO source, subject to the distance limits provided in the product’s instruction manual.

[Div. B, 2.16.2.1.]
27. What does “adjacent to each sleeping area” mean in terms of installation location?


In general, this phrase means the hallway serving or area outside the sleeping area. For instance, a CO alarm must be installed in the hallway adjacent to multiple bedrooms in a house or apartment.

However, there may be situations where “adjacent to each sleeping area” refers to the area around the bed, within the bedroom or sleeping area itself.

[Div. B, 2.16.2.1.]
28. When are CO alarms required to be installed within an apartment building?


If a fuel-burning appliance or a fireplace is installed in the apartment suite, a CO alarm is required to be installed adjacent to each sleeping area within the suite.

If an apartment suite shares a common wall or floor/ceiling assembly with a garage, a CO alarm is required to be installed adjacent to each sleeping area within the suite.

If an apartment suite shares a common wall or floor/ceiling assembly with a service room containing a fuel-burning appliance, a CO alarm is required to be installed adjacent to each sleeping area within the suite.

If the apartment building’s service room contains a fuel-burning appliance, a CO alarm is required to be installed in the service room.

[Div. B, 2.16.2.1.]
29. If an apartment suite has a fuel burning appliance, do neighbouring suites that share either a common wall or floor/ceiling assembly require a CO alarm?


No. This maintains consistency with OBC requirements.
30. Does an apartment suite that is located across the corridor from a service room containing a fuel-burning appliance require a CO alarm?


No. This maintains consistency with OBC requirements.
31. If an apartment suite has no fuel burning appliance, but has concealed spaces that contain ducts servicing fuel fire appliances located outside of the suite, does the suite require a CO alarm?


No. This maintains consistency with OBC requirements.

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CO Alarm Standards
32. What standards apply to CO alarms?


There are two industry standards referenced under the OFC and OBC, namely CSA-6.19-01, “Residential Carbon Monoxide Alarming Devices” and UL 2034-2008, “Single and Multiple Station Carbon Monoxide Detectors”.

[Div. B, 2.16.2.1.(5)]
33. Are CO alarms required to have a secondary power source (i.e. battery) in the event of a power failure?


No, this maintains consistency with the OBC.

However, for optimum protection, it is recommended that consumers choosing to install hard wired or plug-in type CO alarms, purchase units that include a secondary power source.

[Div. B, 2.16.2.1.(5)]
34. Can CO alarms that are designed to be placed (i.e. not permanently secured) on a surface permitted?


Yes. Battery operated CO alarms that can be placed on a surface are acceptable as long as they are in compliance with CSA-6.19-01, “Residential Carbon Monoxide Alarming Devices” or UL 2034-2008, “Single and Multiple Station Carbon Monoxide Detectors”.

[Div. B, 2.16.2.1.(5)]
35. Can combination smoke/CO alarms be installed?


Yes. Combination smoke/CO alarms that are in compliance with the appropriate smoke alarm and CO alarm standards referenced in the OFC can be installed.

[Div. B, 2.16.2.1.(5)]

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Replacement
36. How often are CO alarms required to be replaced?


CO alarms are required to be replaced within the timeframe indicated in the manufacturer’s instructions and/or on the label on the unit.

CO alarm sensors can deteriorate and lose sensitivity over time due to environmental conditions.

[Div. B, 6.3.4.7.(3)]
37. What is the significance of the August 6, 2001 construction date referenced in the replacement requirements under OFC Division B, Sentences 6.3.4.7.(4) and (5)?


August 6, 2001 is the date when current CO alarm installation requirements were introduced in the OBC for the construction of new residential buildings.

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Testing
38. How often are CO alarms required to be tested?


In a rental dwelling unit, the landlord must test CO alarms annually, after the battery is replaced and after every change in tenancy.

The landlord must also test CO alarms that are connected to an electrical circuit after any change is made to the electrical circuit.

[Div. B, 6.3.4.8]
39. How is a CO alarm tested?


A CO alarm is tested by activating the test feature as described in the manufacturer’s maintenance instructions.

[Div. B, 6.3.4.8.(5)]
40. Are landlord records of CO alarm testing required?


Yes. As per the requirement of Sentence 1.1.2.1.(1) of Division B, records of tests are to be retained at the building premises for examination by the Chief Fire Official.

[Div. B, 6.3.4.2, 1.1.2.1.(1)]

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Enforcement
41. What is the impact of the CO alarm regulation on existing municipal CO alarm by-laws?


Section 79 of the Fire Protection and Prevention Act, 1997, states that the OFC supersedes all municipal by-laws related to the presence of unsafe levels of CO.

CO alarms that were installed to meet a municipal by-law must be maintained in accordance with the OFC effective October 15, 2014.
42. If I don’t comply with the OFC, can I be charged?


Yes. Once the compliance dates for CO alarms have passed, anyone found to be in contravention of these requirement can be charged and if convicted would be subject to penalties.
43. Is there a Part I ticketable offence for CO alarm violations?


The ministry is developing new short form wording to increase the number of ticketable offences under the Provincial Offences Act for a number of Fire Code violations, including those relating to CO alarms.
44. When the new Part I ticketable offences are enacted, will the set fine and total payable be the same as the current Part I OFC offences?


The set fines are currently under consideration.
45. Does that mean I cannot be charged until such time as the CO alarm violations can be prosecuted by a Part I ticket process?

No. There are penalties under the FPPA for individuals who are convicted for not complying with the OFC. The process for prosecuting the CO alarm violations would require the issuance of a Part III Information pursuant to the Provincial Offences Act. This process requires the defendant to be served with a summons.
46. If convicted under Part III of the Provincial Offences Act, would the penalty be the same as a Part I offence?


No. Failure to comply with the OFC could result in a fine of up to $50,000 and/or imprisonment for up to one year for individuals or $100,000 for corporations.
47. Can a fire department serve an Inspection Order under Section 21(1) of the FPPA to address a CO alarm related Fire Code violation in the building?


Yes. Since the definition of “fire safety” under the FPPA has been revised to address “unsafe levels of carbon monoxide”, CO alarm related OFC violations can be addressed through an Inspection Order.
48. Can a fire department use the Immediate Threat to Life provisions under Section 15 of the FPPA to alleviate a CO alarm related hazard in the building?


No. Section 15 of the FPPA only applies when there are reasonable grounds to believe that a risk of fire poses an immediate threat to life.

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Other
49. Do CO alarms need to be addressed in a fire safety plan?


Although CO alarms do not specifically fall within the scope of Subsection 2.8.2., it would be a good practice to include in the fire safety plan their maintenance requirements and any special procedures to follow should the CO alarm sound.

[Div. B, 2.8.2]

Visit http://www.mcscs.jus.gov.on.ca/english/FireMarshal/CarbonMonoxideAlarms/QuestionsandAnswers/OFM_COAlarms_QandA.html for more information.

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Carbon Monoxide Detection and Troubleshooting

If your CO Detector is going off, what should you do?

4 BEEPS and a pause is a common alarm

1 BEEP intermitantly could be a low battery

1) Are you or anyone else in the home feeling unwell, headache, stiffness, pets sick?

2) Have you checked the CO Detector for low battery? Even plug in detectors have a battery back up that requires fresh batteries at least annually. ( How about changing them when you change smoke alarm batteries?)

3) Check the date of manufacture on the detector, many detectors are designed to operate for only 5 years and then require replacement. ( If the date on the detector is over 5 years and the detector does not indicate a longer life span on the detector, replace it.)

4) You should have more than 1 CO detector, for comparison and as an extra safety measure.

5) If you have multiple CO detectors are they all alarming or just one detector?( Detector could be defective if only one is activated)

6) Do you have all your CO producing appliances serviced annually? ( Furnace- Hot water tank- Boiler- Fireplace - Range - BBQ- Dryer)

7) Gas / Propane Clothes dryers use the dryer vent to exhaust the heater in the dryer. Lack of service and cleaning maintenance can block the vent, create a blockage and could start a fire!

8) Snow building up around vents and air intakes can strangle appliances causing them to operate poorly and may increase CO production.

9) Do not warm up vehicle in garage or near the home as CO can migrate into the home during the day and could activate alarm when you open interior door to garage.

10) If all these tips fail, open your windows, exit the home and call a service contractor. If there is a medical emergency call 911 or your local emergency number and exit the home!

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Does Retrofit apply to my Rental Property?

Please contact CFPO Duncan Rydall for all inquiries(contact info on Fire Prevention page) in regards to rental accomodations, retrofit legislation, and how to bring your rental property into compliance with the Ontario Fire Code

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How long does Carbon Monoxide alarms last?

Carbon Monoxide alarms are now law, they must be installed if you have fuel fired appliances, an attached garage or share a wall with a service room containing a fuel fired appliance.

Carbon Monoxide alarms have a 5, 7 and 10 year life spans. Be sure to read the packaging when you purchase or replace your CO Alarms. A "Chirp" sound may alert you that the alarm may need a new battery or it may indicate and "End of Life "Signal for the device. Most manufacturers have detailed indicators printed on the back of the CO alarm.

Avoid running vehicles inside garages or near openings to homes as the CO produced by the idling can get into the home.

Service CO producing appliances such as furnaces and fireplaces annually to protect you and your family.

Co Alarms should be installed outside sleeping areas and inside them if you have a fuel fired appliance such as a fireplace in the master suite. If you have any questions about CO, contact the fire department or your fuel supplier.

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Who should I call to report a dead animal on the street for pick up?

On Town roads, please contact the Town of The Blue Mountains Municipal Office at 519-599-3131 Ext. 276. 

On Highway 26, please contact IMOS 1-888-222-2640.

On County roads, please contact Grey County at 519-376-7339.

Please note that if there is a dead animal reported within our 66’ road allowance we will pick it up within one business day. 

If there is a dead animal reported that has blocked or restricted the lane for traffic, we will pick it up the same day. 

For dead animals that are in the water (Lake or Bay) please call the Ministry of Natural Resources at  800-667-1940 or the Grey Sauble Conservation Authority at 519-376-3076.

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Why am I required to pay a Security Alarm Registration fee; do my tax dollars not already pay for policing?

Registration fees are paid to the municipality for the purposes of compiling and maintaining a Security Alarm Registration System. 

Yes. Your tax dollars do go towards OPP policing, however, one of the purposes of this by-law is to utilize our police services more efficiently.
 

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What is the Security Alarm By-law?

The Security By-law requires that all alarm systems within The Blue Mountains be registered with the municipality.

Along with the registration, registration fees are required to be paid to the municipality for the purposes of compiling and maintaining a Security Alarm Registration System.

A system of warnings, fees and possible suspension of Police dispatch are implemented in the instances of false dispatches.
 
Fees:

Residential Registration - $25.00 (per 3 year period)
Commercial Registration-$50.00(per 3 year period)
Change of Ownership- As per registration fee

False Alarm #1 in a 365 day period-$0.00
False Alarm #2-$50.00
False Alarm # 3-$100.00 

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Click the link below for frequently asked questions regarding on-site sewage systems in Ontario...
What are the accepted methods of payment for taxes and utilities?

Taxes and utilities can be paid in person at Town Hall using cheque, debit card or cash as payment method types, or by mail using a cheque. Taxes and utilities can also be paid on-line through your financial institution.

The Town is pleased to offer pre-authorized payment options for ratepayers. Simply contact Town Hall to set up your pre-authorized payment plan.

Visit http://www.thebluemountains.ca/assessment-taxation.cfm for more information.

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What are the accepted methods of payment for Town related services, fees and fines?
  • Building and Planning related fees can be paid in person using cheque, cash or debit.
  • Infrastructure and Public Works related fees can be paid in person using cheque, cash or debit.
  • By-law infractions (tickets) can be paid in person using cheque, cash or debit, through the mail by cheque.

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Where do I purchase Bag Tags?

Tags can be purchased at Town Hall or selected retail outlets noted in the Waste Resource Guide. 

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When do I need to use a Bag Tag on my garbage bag?

Each residential unit and commercial unit may place at curb side ONE bag or can as part of the service and a second bag or can which must be TAGGED, for a MAXIMUM of TWO bags or cans of garbage at the curb per week.

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My recycling boxes were not picked up today. Who should I call?

Please ensure your recycling was placed at the curb by 7:00a.m. and is sorted into the accepted blue box materials and accepted grey box materials.  Please refer to the Waste Resource Guide for the list of acceptable materials for recycling.  For information please call 519-599-3131 ext. 276.

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Where can I dispose of hazardous waste?

The Town Landfill Site now has a Hazardous Waste Depot. Open May to September during disposal site hours of operation. Loads over 100 kg please call before delivering (519) 599-6760. For information on hazardous waste depot and hazardous waste items see the Waste Resource Guide, or call (519) 599-3131 ex.276

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What is the phone number for the Clarksburg Post Office?

The phone number for the Clarksburg Post Office is 519-599-2260.

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What is the phone number for the Thornbury Post Office?

The phone number for the Thornbury Post Office is 519-599-2212.

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Can I burn brush on my property?

For information regarding burning brush on your property, please contact The Blue Mountains Fire Department at 519-599-2211.

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What is the population of The Blue Mountains?

The Town of The Blue Mountains uses two population data sources.

Census data from 2011 indicates that the full-time resident population of The Blue Mountains is 6,453.  This figure does not include our seasonal residents or day visitors.

According to the most recent data provided by the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation,  we estimate our total full-time and part-time population to be 13,833.  Using the same data source, along with information from other sources, we estimate our day population (including visitors) to be 28,833.

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Who is my Member of Provincial Parliament?

Your Member of Provincial Parliament is Jim Wilson, M.P.P. Simcoe –Grey.

Contact information:

50 Hume Street
Collingwood, Ontario L9Y 1V2
Phone: (705) 446-1090
Toll Free: 1-800-268-7542
Fax: 705-446-3397
jim.wilson@pc.ola.org

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Who is my Member of Parliament?

Your Member of Parliament is Dr. Kellie Leitch, M.P. Simcoe-Grey.

Contact information:

501 Hume Street Collingwood, Ontario L9Y 4H8

 

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The normal flow of water through the ditch/culvert system is restricted/ causing flooding. Who should I call?

For information, please call 519-599-3131, ext. 276.

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When will the snow be removed from my road?

For information please call 519-599-3131 ext. 276.

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Who is my Hydro provider?

Hydro service for Thornbury is provided by Collus. The phone number for Collus is 705-445-1800.

Hydro service for all other areas of The Blue Mountains is provided by Hydro One. The phone number for Hydro One is 1-888-664-9376.

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What are the hours of operation for the L.E. Shore Memorial Library?

The hours of operation for the Library are:

  • Monday: 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday and Thursday: 10:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Friday and Saturday : 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • Sunday : 12:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

 

 
Visit http://thebluemountainslibrary.ca/ for more information.

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What is the phone number for the L.E. Shore Memorial Library?

The phone number is 519-599-3681.

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What is the phone number for the County of Grey Roads Department?

The phone number is 519-376-7339.

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What is the phone number for the County of Grey Administration Offices?

The phone number is 519-376-2205.

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What is the phone number for the landfill site?

The phone number is 519-599-6760.

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Where can I purchase Compost?

Compost may be purchased at the Landfill Site, located at 788097 Grey County Road 13, depending on availability for $0.03 per kg. Please bring your own packaging material and shovel to load.

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Does The Town Pick up yard waste (leaves, plant trimmings, grass)?

Yes, limited yard waste is collected from May 1, 2017 to May 25, 2017 and from October 30, 2017 to November 23, 2017.  Yard waste will be collected on your regular curbside collection day.  A maximum of 10 containers or compostable paper bags (35" X 16") of yard waste will be collected per week.  If using containers, please leave lid off, making the yard waste visible for collection.

Christmas trees will be collected on your regular collection day, from January 2, 2018 to January 5, 2018 only.  Place the bare tree (without bag) at the curb on your regular day of collection during this week and keep the tree free of snow.

Extra or oversized yard waste can be delivered by the resident to the Landfill Site during regular hours of operation, free of charge.

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Does The Blue Mountains have special pick-up days for oversized items?

No, we do not have special pick-up days for oversized items. Large items, such as furniture, appliances, fixtures and cabinetry can be taken to the landfill site. Disposal fees will apply. Landfil Site hours of operation Tuesday & Thursday 8am - 4pm (year round) and Saturday 8am - 12noon (year round).

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Where can I get a Blue Box, Grey Box, Green Bin Rain Barrel or Back Yard Composter?

These are available to The Blue Mountains residents and can be purchased at the Landfill Site, located at 788097 Grey Rd.13. Blue Boxes, Grey Boxes and Green Bins are also available at the Town Hall.  Blue Boxes and Grey Boxes can be purchased for $5.00 each. Rain barrels can be purchased for $60.00 each. Composters can be purchased for $30.00.  Green Bins are $10.00 and Kitchen Catchers are $3.00 each.

Visit http://www.thebluemountains.ca/solid-waste.cfm for more information.

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What happens with garbage collection on a Holiday?

Waste will be collected on most statutory holidays excluding Christmas Day  and New Year's Day.

Please see The Wastewatcher Waste Collection Guide for all Statutory Holiday dates.

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Does the Town collect kitchen waste (organics)?

Yes, the Town's Organic Waste Collection Program began October 1, 2015.  Organic waste (food waste) is collected weekly from curbside and centrally from condos.  Green Bins have been distributed for use in the program.  For more information: www.thebluemountains.ca/waste-collection.cfm.

 

 

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Where is the Landfill Site? And, when is it open?

The Landfill Site is located at 788090 Grey Road 13, just south of Grey Road 40 - look for the sign on the east side of the road.

Hours of operation are Tuesdays and Thursdays from 8am to 4pm (year round) and Saturdays 8am to noon (year round).

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What are the hours of operation for the landfill site and pick up and holiday schedules for solid waste collection in The Blue Mountains?

All information regarding landfill site hours and waste pick-up schedules can be found on our waste collection page or in the Waste Resource Guide.

The usual hours of operation at the landfill site are Tuesdays and Thursdays 8-4 year round and Saturdays 8-noon year round.

 

Visit http://www.thebluemountains.ca/solid-waste.cfm for more information.

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Where is The Blue Mountains landfill site located?

The landfill site is located on Grey Road 13, south of Grey Road 40.
Directions from Thornbury:
Travel south on Bruce Street.  Bruce Street turns into Grey Road 13. The Landfill site is on the left-hand side, past the Grey Road 40 intersection.

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What is the mailing address for Town Hall?

Our mailing address is: Town of The Blue Mountains, P.O. Box 310, 32 Mill Street, Thornbury, Ontario N0H 2P0
 

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Where can I find email addresses for staff and elected officials?

All email addresses for staff and elected officials can be found on our staff directory page.

The email address for general inquiries is info@thebluemountains.ca.

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